Direct Democracy in Switzerland Gets Real Issues Into the Public Debate

Direct Democracy in Switzerland Gets Real Issues Into the Public Debate

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The Swiss continue to show the way in how their system of direct democracy enables real issues to come to public debate.

Earlier this year the Swiss debated and voted on Basic Income as an alternative to social welfare. Now they are bringing the whole issue of debt free sovereign money to the public consciousness.

For the last century our money has been issued as debt by private banks, usually through the issuance of loans which expand the money supply as money of credit. This of course is subject to interest and both cause the devaluation of money.

A group called Momo in Switzerland is bringing this issue to debate under the name the Vollgeld Initiative and hope to raise the required 100,000 signatures for a  referendum.

The issuance and control of money is a subject no-one has been able to get discussed on media or with politicians. There are too many vested interests preventing it. This political system forces it into the public domain and educates the whole population. This is  one of the main benefits of a direct democracy system

Sovereign debt free money is also a subject about which we need a serious debate in Ireland..

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1 Comment

  • Posted June 2, 2014

    Donal O’Brolchain

    The Swiss system of direct democracy does focus on issues, which I support completely.
    If I have understood this correctly, there are two major features of this system of direct democracy
    1. The legislature (at both Federal and cantonal levels) can make a counter-proposal to that arising from citizens’ initiative. Both then have to put to the electorate on the same, with some specification on how the results are to be interpreted and implemented.
    2. The Swiss do not have any provision for recall elections of individuals elected to public office. This limits the scope for personality-based political discussion and action.

    Both of these keep a focus on issues and promote public discussion of issues, which I imagine leads to greater understanding.
    These features lead to the mutual education of the democratic process, between those who govern us and us who are governed.

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